About Celluminova

Celluminova specializes in developing new tools for stem cell research, including cancer stem cells. The patented biomarker GlioStem is intended for live stem cell detection and visualization.

About Celluminova

Celluminova’s core technology is centered around the molecular luminescent biomarker GlioStem, which, unlike existing methods, is indicative of glioma stem cells (GSCs).

GlioStem is an oligothiophene derivative sprung from research at Karolinska Institute (KI) and Linköping University (LiU), which can penetrate physiological cell membranes and selectively bind to structures inside the GSCs. GlioStem is conveniently administered onto the investigated tissue or cell culture by a pipette. After only a few minutes, the GSCs will emit green light from GlioStem molecules under illumination. The high luminescence specificity for the GSCs has been verified in large in vitro studies, including a great variety of human and animal cells, in animal models and human tumor tissue. Moreover, we have shown that the high GlioStem specificity permits efficient separation of GSCs from astrocytes and other glioma cells. It is known that GSCs are resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy. Therefore, being able to detect and eliminate GSCs during tumor resection would mean a crucial step towards increased patient survival.

Our goal

We aim at supplying means for fluorescence-assisted surgery with near-instant feedback from live microscopy observations of glioma stem cells, facilitating more accurate resections of the tumor-initiating tissue.

Our vision

To have our products used in clinical labs and surgery rooms around the world, facilitating discoveries in life science and improving clinical outcomes.

Our mission

To develop new tools for visualization and isolation of stem cells and cancer stem cells in developing organisms and tumors.

After only a few minutes, the stem cells will emit green light from GlioStem molecules under illumination.

“Emerging research suggests that failure to target glioma stem cells (GSCs) rather than the inability to remove tumors through surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy, explains the poor survival of GBM patients. Therefore, being able to detect and eliminate GSCs during tumor resection would mean a crucial step towards increased patient survival.”
Scroll